Step 2: Take the Exam

Oregon Instructor and Examiner Tracy using medical equipment (in this case, a wheelchair) during an exam. It's important that dogs can stay calm around items they might not see everyday but that are common in visit environments.

Oregon Instructor and Examiner Tracy using medical equipment (in this case, a wheelchair) during an exam. It's important that dogs can stay calm around items they might not see everyday but that are common in visit environments.

About the Exam

The Project Canine Therapy Team Exam tests your ability to work as a team in new and potentially stressful situations. Your dog must show an appropriate demeanor for therapy visiting and must also be able to perform basic obedience skills including sit, down, stay, walk on a loose leash, and come when called. We will also test your dog's ability to respond safely around food, toys, medical equipment, and other dogs. We'll be watching to make sure you communicate with and advocate for your dog throughout the exam. (Sound scary? Don't worry, we'll go over the entire exam during class, and we'll let you know whether or not we think you're ready to test.) For the exam, you will need to bring proof of vaccines or titers and a recent fecal float, so please make sure you have checked in with your vet before signing up.

Please remember, the exam is for only for prospective teams who have successfully completed class and renewing Project Canine teams.

Our Philosophy

We believe that handlers who can recognize and manage their dog's stress (and their own) are safer, more effective, and happier.

Things you might want to know:
What equipment can I use to train, test, and visit?
How do I know if my dog is ready?

Have more questions?
Click here to go to our Frequently Asked Questions page.

We test puppies as young as 5 months with an age-appropriate version of the test. Please read our Puppies page for more information.

Cost: $40.00


Test Your Knowledge

Did you know that dogs don't like to be hugged? Really, they don't. But people, especially kids, hug dogs all the time. That's why we teach our handlers to manage their dog's environment, and that's also why we test our dogs to make sure they can handle being hugged when it does happen. Read more about dogs and hugging.